• Download your free audio program and get your questions answered now!

    • Contact Us

Blog

Keep up to date with the latest tips and trends in the world of voice over

Your Voiceover Career – Where To Begin

01 March

If people tell you all the time that you have a great voice for voice over.  If you listen to voices on radio and television and think, ‘I could do that’! , and if you have believe you could work as a voiceover artists, success might be closer than you think.  But breaking into voiceover and establishing a voiceover career needs a well thought through plan, some really good voice coaching and a sensational voice demo. And this is where I come in!

Because, believe it or not, great voiceover coaching in a professional studio situation is really the only way you can experience for yourself the ins and outs of what it takes to be a voiceover artist and find out all you’ll ever need to know about creating a great voiceover demo.

Now, you might be thinking, ‘no, I can just put a demo together in my home studio or my friends’ studio’, or ‘I can go to a studio and for a few hundred dollars they’ll put a demo together for me’.  Now, the fact is, both of these experiences can be useful, but I’d like to explain the pitfalls of going down this path and why your demo won’t succeed in getting you work, before I give you the directions to the path that will lead to work.

  • Putting a demo together in your home studio

I really have to say, there is nothing wrong with doing this, as long as you call it practice.  In fact I encourage any voiceover artist or voiceover        potential to do that.  The practice that is going to do you the most good      at home, is ‘reading’ and ‘listening’ practice.  Developing your sight       reading and an ear for the         sound of your voice and your own      uniqueness, strengths and limitations is really important, but to make a    demo that you send out to the industry without really knowing what       you’d be cast for is a recipe for disappointment.

  • Putting a demo together at a studio

I’ll also say that there’s nothing wrong with doing this either.  It’s a great       way to get some studio miles and have a studio experience, but it’s a     known fact that making a demo without any prior coaching, rarely leads       to any or much work.  Why?  There are a few reasons.  Sometimes the scripts that you are asked to choose from at a studio are dated and often      you choose something you would never be cast for, but the big reason this is           not ideal is that you only have an hour or so to record a selection         of 5 to 7 scripts, and this is just too much for one hour.  I would never          be able to do that many scripts justice in that small amount of time.  The    likelihood is, that they will pretty much sound the same.

Having a demo is, as you know, crucial to getting work.  In fact, one of the most important events in the process of becoming a voiceover artist is the casting process.  And the thing is, you’re never there for it.  Only your demo is!  So your demo needs to say it all.  It needs be a high quality recoding, containing your interpretation of interesting, current scripts that your voice would be cast for and it needs to give the impression that you absolutely know what you’re doing

So the best way to get your hands on that winning voice demo, is to really understand who you are and where you’d fit in.  If you believe you have the talent and ability, then you can’t afford to cut corners when it comes to making a demo and launching a career.

If you do think you can go it alone, or you really feel you are ready to make a demo then download my audio program from https://voiceovercoach.com.au called ‘How to Make the Best Ever Voice Demo‘.  If you’re serious about being a voiceover artist, sign up for the newsletter, receive the free download and get on the right path to becoming a successful voiceover artist.

Abbe Holmes About Abbe Holmes
Find Your Voice As a Voice Over Actor And Artist With The Voice Over Coach. For over 30 years I've had a successful voiceover career. I work in mainstream voice over for radio and television, narration for the corporate sector, website content and documentaries, as well as characters for animation, IVR, ADR, on-hold and foreign film dubbing.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply